Marxism and nationalism

Fall 2018

Group leaders: KM & DR

I will simply point out an error of principle that has led the French astray since the first moment of their revolution.

The constitution of 1795, like its predecessors, has been drawn up for “Man.” Now, there is no such thing in the world as Man. In the course of my life, I have seen Frenchmen, Italians, Russians, etc.; I am even aware, thanks to Montesquieu, that one can be a Persian. But as for Man, I declare that I have never met him in my life. If he exists, I certainly have no knowledge of him.

— Joseph de Maistre, Considérations sur la France (1797)

CUNY Graduate Center
Room 5414, 6:00 PM

Wednesday, October 10
  1. Eric Hobsbawm, Nations and Nationalism since 1780 (1990)
  2. Kontraklasa, “Left Nationalism: A History of the Disease” (2017)
Wednesday, October 24
  1. Michael Billig, Banal Nationalism (1995)
  2. Paul Mattick, “Nationalism and Socialism” (1959)
Friday, November 15
  1. Rosa Luxemburg, The National Question (1907)
  2. Vladimir Lenin, The Right of Nations to Self-Determination (1914)
  3. Michael Löwy, “Marxists and the National Question” (1976)
Wednesday, December 5
  1. Vladimir Lenin
    1. “Draft Theses on National and Colonial Questions” (June 1920)
    2. “Report Of The Commission On The National and The Colonial Questions” (July 1920)
  2. Manabendra Nath Roy
    1. “Supplementary Theses On The National And Colonial Question” (July 25, 1920)
    2. “The Empire and the Revolution” (October 1922)
    3. “Speech in Discussion of the Eastern Question” (November 22, 1922)
    4. “On Patriotism” (June 12, 1923)
  3. José Carlos Mariátegui
    1. Seven Interpretive Essays on Peruvian Reality (1928)
    2. “Anti-Imperialist Viewpoint” (June 1929)
Advertisements

The Greek crisis: A talk with Pavlos Roufos

Saturday, November 24, 2018
7 – 10 PM

The Base, 1302 Myrtle Avenue
Brooklyn, New York 11221

 

Facebook event page

Pavlos Roufos presents his new book A Happy Future is a Thing of the Past: The Greek Crisis and other Disasters, published in association with the Brooklyn Rail. Setting the 2010 Greek economic crisis in its historical context, Roufos explores the creation of the Eurozone, its “glorious” years, and today’s political threats to its existence. By interweaving stories of individual people’s lived experiences and describing in detail the politicians, policies, personalities, and events at the heart of the collapse, he situates its development both in terms of the particularities of the Greek economy and the overall architecture of Europe’s monetary union.

With both austerity and debt burdens still present, Pavlos answers the question: If the programs were doomed to fail from the start, as many claim, what were the real objectives of such devastating austerity? This broad examination also illuminates the social movements that emerged in Greece in response to the crisis, unpacking what both the crisis managers and many of their critics presented as a given: that a happy future is a thing of the past.

A careful and penetrating analysis of the cruel torment of Greece, and its background in the emerging global political economy, as the regimented capitalism of the early postwar period, with gains for much of the population, has been subjected to the assault of neoliberal globalization, with grim effects and threatening consequences.

— Noam Chomsky

This presentation is sponsored by Prometeo collective.